This is just a reminder that, when exploring abandoned places, you should try your best to leave them as they are.  Don’t break windows, or cause damage.  That ruins the place for other people. 

mobylosangelesarchitecture:

i just got back from detroit, where i was playing at the movement festival (which was as festivals go, i say with some objectivity, amazing).

i’ve been going to detroit since the late 80’s (as it is the birthplace of modern electronic music), and i’ve always loved it.

culturally and musically and artistically it’s a fascinating place, but it’s also fascinating in that it has more remarkable abandoned buildings than any other city in the western world (this might sound like hyperbole, but i’m guessing it’s actually true).

it’s worth stating that there are big parts of detroit that are not filled with abandoned buildings. and those are nice, too… but the parts of downtown detroit that are filled with beautiful old abandoned buildings are aesthetically amazing (as evidenced by the fact that lots and lots of people have taken pictures of them).

on saturday i had the afternoon off, so my friend shannon (who lives in a former abandoned building) took me on a bike ride around detroit to look at her favorite abandoned buildings (what she refers to as ‘ruin porn’).
here are some of my favorites.

and i hope that these buildings at some point get the love and care that they deserve. but in the meantime: ruin porn.

thanks,

moby

Abandoned Amusement Park in New Orleans

I keep seeing this post, and I thought I’d come out of retirement to settle record straight. These aren’t all pictures of Six Flags New Orleans. These pictures are also from parks in Ohio, Japan, Ukraine, Spain, and Germany. :)

(Source: motionburnsthemood, via comic-chick)

endthymes:

kisho kurokawa, nagakin ‘capsule’ tower; capsule residence interior view

Oh  man, a picture of the interior of the capsule tower before it fell into disrepair.  what a view. 

endthymes:

kisho kurokawa, nagakin ‘capsule’ tower; capsule residence interior view

Oh  man, a picture of the interior of the capsule tower before it fell into disrepair.  what a view. 

(via -plusle)

malformalady:

The overgrown indoor swimming pool area at the abandoned Grossinger’s Catskills Resort. Grossinger’s Resort in the town of Liberty in New York’s Catskills was famous back in its heyday. Grossinger’s gained fame in 1952, when it became the first resort to use artificial snow for its ski-fanatic patrons. Grossinger’s was closed in 1986 and to this day sits abandoned next to a still working golf-course.
Photo credit: ©  Lyle Kamenir

malformalady:

The overgrown indoor swimming pool area at the abandoned Grossinger’s Catskills Resort. Grossinger’s Resort in the town of Liberty in New York’s Catskills was famous back in its heyday. Grossinger’s gained fame in 1952, when it became the first resort to use artificial snow for its ski-fanatic patrons. Grossinger’s was closed in 1986 and to this day sits abandoned next to a still working golf-course.

Photo credit: © Lyle Kamenir

(via phantomsqueaker-archives)

austrias-piano:

sleighdirector:

Here’s the inside of a deserted Blockbuster

beautiful ancient ruins

austrias-piano:

sleighdirector:

Here’s the inside of a deserted Blockbuster

beautiful ancient ruins

(via stopdeandasgay)

Hey everyone!  I recently went to see “Skyfall” in the theater (gr8 movie), and to my surprise, Hashima Island (also known as Gukanjima or Battleship island) was a location. 
For those of you who haven’t heard of it, Gunkanjima was a tiny island off the coast of Japan.  It was surrounded by underwater coal mines (Japan’s main export at the time), and so became home to thousands of workers and their families.  These workers were forced into very close quarters, the concrete apartment blocks crammed together on the tiny island. The island’s weather is incredibly hostile, and for a good portion of the year, the island is flooded because of large waves.  
As of 2009, ships are allowed to dock on Hashima’s shores, but you have to have special permission to get closer to the buildings, as many of them are falling apart. 

Hey everyone!  I recently went to see “Skyfall” in the theater (gr8 movie), and to my surprise, Hashima Island (also known as Gukanjima or Battleship island) was a location. 

For those of you who haven’t heard of it, Gunkanjima was a tiny island off the coast of Japan.  It was surrounded by underwater coal mines (Japan’s main export at the time), and so became home to thousands of workers and their families.  These workers were forced into very close quarters, the concrete apartment blocks crammed together on the tiny island. The island’s weather is incredibly hostile, and for a good portion of the year, the island is flooded because of large waves. 

As of 2009, ships are allowed to dock on Hashima’s shores, but you have to have special permission to get closer to the buildings, as many of them are falling apart. 

fuckyeahabandonedplaces:

Bright Open Power Plant by SPΞRRZOΠΞ on Flickr.
Via Flickr: abandoned power plant in Budapest

fuckyeahabandonedplaces:

Bright Open Power Plant by SPΞRRZOΠΞ on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
abandoned power plant in Budapest

(via impactrueno)

// Still looking for help with this blog! //

Thank you to all the new followers!  But, I really need some help running this blog.  I can no longer do it alone. Read my previous posts for details.  <3

A blog of abandoned places in the United States and beyond.